1 EAGLETON NOTES: Monday Miscellany

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Monday, 3 June 2013

Monday Miscellany

There are a number of little points which in themselves are not posts but when added together.

A friend who retired a couple of years ago and who now lives in Spain and Glasgow was recently asked what he did now that he's retired.  "Nothing" he responded.  "Then what do you do with your free time?"  he was asked again.  "I'm far too busy doing nothing to have any free time."  Isn't that the truth?

Why do people advertise "Fresh Eggs"?  Are they likely to sell stale ones?

For the umpteenth time today (like every day) I walked from one room to another only to get sidetracked or, even worse, end up standing in the place where I had arrived completely oblivious as to why had gone there.  Having read CJ's recent post Thank Heavens For Research which drew readers' attention to the idea that walking through a doorway triggers what's known as an ‘event boundary’ in the mind, separating one set of thoughts and memories from the next. Your brain files away the thoughts you had in the previous room and prepares a blank slate for the new locale.

There are five doors between my study and my bedroom.  I have no hope whatsoever of remembering what I went there for.

This one is for UK readers.  Where have all the £2 coins gone.  I have only seen one since I returned to Scotland.  Actually I've seen two because I was given my change today in £1 coins and when I remarked on the lack of £2 coins everyone scratched their heads and between the till and all the pockets only one could be found.

The RNLI lifeboat powered past the bay a few days ago.  Whenever that happens I wonder who is in peril and I am thankful for the fact that we have such wonderful rescue services.


Night night.

14 comments:

  1. That research explains a lot. And here I thought I was having senior moments when it is a matter of going through a door way and entering a different room. Fascinating.

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    1. Yes, Terra, that's what I thought. It made me feel better anyway.

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  2. I read John's post and was thankful that I live in the van. Only three doors one for the shower, one for the toilet. The facilities give me a clue what I've gone in for.

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    1. Yes Adrian. Whichever room in the house I go into I'm highly unlikely to go for a set purpose although even I am unlikely to forget what I went into the bathroom for. Unless, of course, it's for a first aid item or the sunblock or.... Perhaps it's not so straightforward even there.

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  3. Now that you've mentioned it, I shall look out for 2-pound-coins when I'll be in England in six weeks.
    Five doors between your study and bedroom! I had no idea you live in a mansion. Is your bedroom in the east or west wing?

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    1. It's hardly a mansion Meike. In fact it's not very large at all. It just has a lot of rooms and is a very peculiar layout.

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  4. I guess the 2-pound coins are slowly going the way of the US$2.00 bill.
    I don't think I can blame the "event boundary" theory for forgetting stuff, especially if it's only a few feet away from where I started out and no doors involved.
    "Fresh eggs" need to be apart from the "Not so Fresh eggs."...smile.

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    1. Yes, Virginia, it's all rather odd. Mind you a £2 coin's just as cumbersome as 2 x £1 coins. I'm with you on the "event boundary" theory not being the only way of forgetting things.

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  5. I wonder if it makes any difference if the doors are open? Mine are rarely closed, so perhaps there is no justification for my forgetfulness. Great shot of the rescue craft, I can imagine what a welcome sight that is sometimes!

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    1. Pauline, it seems not to matter if the doors are open, it is entering another room that is the important thing. In fact, it applies even to virtual rooms in computer games. I first heard about that research over a year ago and also blogged about it back then (I just went back to check my own post).

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  6. I'm not sure, Pauline, whether the state of the door in the doorway is actually relevant. I'd blame it anyway. It gives me some comfort.

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    1. I've been blaming my doorways ever since I first heard about it :) I "only" have four between my bedroom and study but it's enough!

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  7. oh, my! I'll take any excuse for why I've forgotten why I'm in a room and can't remember why. But it does work for me to retrace my steps to remind myself!

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    1. I wish that it worked for me Norma.

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